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01098883041

  • Total Artists: 6
  • Items Per Page: 12 : 24
  • Shiekh Ali

    From:Naqadah

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    From Qena Governorate and the village of Sheikh Ali comes a lot of history in pottery products. From ancient times the pottery industry had a big impact there and there was a lot of reserved artifacts from that time tell us a lot about how this industry was very popular there and had a lot of improvements over the years. Now the artisans of Sheikh Ali have the heritage of there ancestors and making a lot of famous folkloric bowls and sets that are really good in making tasteful food and nice flavors.

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  • Hagaza Village Wood-Arts

    From:Qus

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    In the village of Hagaza, 17km from Qus on the periphery of the Eastern Desert, we met with Hagaza village wood arts artisans, exceptional artisans. "For some 25 years, the center has been training the unemployed young men of the village in wood working skills in order to alleviate poverty. This center initiated after pop botrous and franco, who train young people in Hagaza to retain their ancestors wood engraving that collect the pharaonic, Coptic and Islamic arts. Fifteen young men each year enroll in the three-year training program operated by an Egyptian non-governmental agency called the Association of Upper Egypt for Education and Development." Gamal Basheir stated. Basheer one of the artisans told us, he one of many others graduated from the program 17 years ago and has been able to provide for his family ever since. "The problem is that some people consider the products expensive, but no one can see the hard work that goes into them. To produce a piece like a panther sculpture, for example, takes about two days. Mostly, the men carve wood from the Sersau (Dalbergia sissoo) tree, which is brought in by the Center from Aswan, and sometimes Qena. " Basheer sees himself and his colleagues as artisans who engrave the symbols of their heritage into each piece they create.   In doing so, they provide a better life for their families, and send out a message of peace to the world. Articals about Hegaza wood work: egypttoday.com

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  • Shandweel Tulle

    From:Sohag

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    In the 1950s, on Shandweel island in the deep south of Egypt, Um Alia hand-crafted traditional wedding clothes for her daughter and other girls in the village — a vital part of the wedding ceremony in that region. She would thread a tiny needle with silver and gold thread, weaving them through Tilly cloth into shapes and symbols representing the heritage of her forebears. She drew camels to indicate the wedding caravan, waves like the waters of the Nile, trees for rural village life, stars for the wedding ceremony's nights, and finally triangles for mountains and to protect the bride from envy. No girl could move to her husband's house without at least three Tilly dresses.  Years passed. Girls began to go to school and were exposed to modern fashions. Um Alia's handmade work went out of style; people were no longer interested in this tradition. Though mothers cannot forget their grandmothers' traditions, they also cannot change the mind of a new generation. In the 1990s, Dr. Shahira Fawzy, an Egyptian researcher, visited Shandweel in search of Um Alia. Fortunately, she found her still alive. Together, Dr. Shahira and Um Alia established a small Tilly handicrafts workshop. Ten girls received training, and each girl would then go on to train another ten. Now, more than 1000 woman work in Tilly handicrafts from their homes and through a number NGOs in Shandweel village. The women of Shandweel have collectively revived the heritage of their grandmothers, a 19thcentury Upper Egyptian tradition.

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  • Mo'tamdia Artisans

    From:Giza

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    In a suburb of Giza and not far from the Pyramids of Giza, more than 150 women gather together daily to teach each other the art of rutal embroidery, they created their own NGO since 1996 to assist them in marketing their products. They live in that area since it was an agricultural area, when they come from Sohag in upper egypt and setteld in Giza, the local environment of their origin villages make an inspiration for them in the production of their distinctive embroidered wool cloth, their works reflect the motifs of Egyptian environment such as palm trees, houses, camels, people, river nile and more  of the Egyptian environment of nature and humans.

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  • Mervat - Folk Dolls

    From:Giza

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    The art of traditional dolls making still one of supreme folkolorik crafts in Egypt that enthuses a lot of artisans. Mervat is one of those artisans who love the art of folkolorik dolls making. A young girl from Mo'tamadia Giza. she design and creates dolls since her childhood and developed a lot from her style by using metal wires, small accessories and lots of colorful fabrics.  In a suburb of Giza and not far from the Pyramids of Giza, more than 150 women gather together daily to teacheach other the art of rutal embroidery, they created their own NGO since 1996 to assist them in marketing their products. They live in that area since it was an agricultural area, when they come from Sohag in upper egypt and setteld in Giza, the local environment of their origin villages make an inspiration for them in the production of their distinctive embroidered wool cloth, their works reflect the motifs of Egyptian environment such as palm trees, houses, camels, people, river nile and more of the Egyptian environment of nature and humans.

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  • Siwa salt arts community

    From:Siwa Oasis

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    Some people may believe that the use of salt is limited to only food, others believe according to customs and traditions that salt protects against envy, but Issa Abdullah, from the oases of Siwa in Matrouh, discovered that salt has and other scientific benefits that are not known to others, that it help spread positive energy and absorbs negative energy that lie within any human. «One piece of rock salt in the bedroom removes from inside the negative energy and puts positive energy throughout the day, also cures many diseases», said Issa Abdullah Moussa, salt lamps maker, pointing out that this salt is different from food salt, and that he is a carpenter originally and that he worked in the craft of salt lamps assisted by all members of his family since 1997. «Issa» explained that when salt lamps are illuminated it produces steam which contains useful ions that purify the air from dust and bacteria and reduce the damage of exposure to magnetic field, and that exposure to these lamps light helps to cure many diseases such as allergies, asthma, arthritis and relieve insomnia, headaches, referring to that his work in the salt craft came coincidentally, when he was working in a hotel in Siwa as a carpenter. «Issa’s» lamps and candles of rock salt became famous all over the world, especially with tourists who were visiting «Siwa» which made him innovates in the salt industry in hotels in Siwa, Hurghada and other places, he said: «I made walls and full chambers with salt rock in some hotels, other than the salt lamps that spread throw the hotel, and that made Prince Charles, the British heir of the throne, and his wife Camilla, who visited one of the hotels in Siwa, speak very highly of my work in salt, which made me make a salt room in a hotel in Hurghada every gust sit there for couple of minutes a day to flush out the negative energy ». As for the stages of manufacturing, he said: «we bring the stones from a Lake called Dahabia Siwa, and extract rock salt blocks, then let it dry in the sun and solidifies then we cut it to small pieces that can be formed later», pointing out that the single piece takes an hour or more, and that they produces 10 pieces a day if it was a big size lamp and if it’s a small piece they produce 50 pieces a day

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Yadaweya Magazine

stay in touch with Egyptian artisans and handmade treasures