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  • Total Artists: 24
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  • Dakhla Oasis Artisans

    From:Dakhla Oases

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    Dakhla Oasis (Egyptian Arabic: الداخلة‎‎ El Daḵla ), translates to the inner oasis, is one of the seven oases of Egypt's Western Desert. Dakhla Oasis lies in the New Valley Governorate, 350 km from the Nile and between the oases of Farafra and Kharga.  Having considerable amounts of underground water, El Dakhla was the capital of the Oasis region during the Pharaonic period. Today, El Dakhla is one of the most wonderful oases in Egypt with many remarkable monuments, natural scenery, and a large collection of Bedouin handicrafts being sold around the oasis. the Dakhla Oasis is considered to be one of the most attractive oases in Egypt. The oasis boasts over 500 hot springs, including Bir Tarfawi and Bir Al-Gebel Hot Spring, as well as charming mud-brick housing and ruins in the medieval town and village of Al-Qasr and Balat. Dakhla is organized around the main town of Mut, a settlement that dates back to pharaonic times. Although Mut has evolved into a modern touristic hub, you can still see today the remnants of the old town. Stroll along the narrow streets and alleyways of the old town with a guide, haggle with local traders or go cycling in Mut and tour the area at your own pace. Of the most famous character, which is famous for its women Dakhla, wicker palm symbols restricted to women only in their homes. It is a leaf growing on both sides of the alarming palm leaves, ranging in length from 20-40 cm, and to get it is performed vaccinations and annual pruning of palm trees, between March and April. And wicker products industry relies on the white wicker ores and green, white Vakhaws maker of home-use products, and the green is used in their own farm work and construction products industry. The braids are weaving wicker by metal needle called "obelisk",  The ceramics and pottery traditions and traditional occupations that her famous oases people of the new and the valley since ancient times as well, and frequented by tourists from all over the world for the acquisition of those with artistic value manufactures, and most famous area for this craft is the Kharga Oasis Village and Islamic palace incoming center, where Fakhura famous village which is so named because it is a great center for pottery and its products known for the people of the village palace. The date of the pottery and porcelain industry oases to antiquity either Romania or Pharaonic. Also one of the most popular character in Dakhla, to find the ladies in their homes, and men older, practicing wool yarn Palmghazl wooden hand, to produce wool yarn, which is used in Acharz industry, a winter clothing, as the robe made of handmade wool, a folk costume for men. And the villages that have mastered this weave wool, Alepeshnda village, which is an affiliate of the Center tile oases, to become one of the most productive areas for carpets and kilims manual, where the craft has evolved in the village over the five decades Then decorated using cotton and silk threads, and sometimes bars cloth, and take the decorations of paramount importance at the same link occasions festive products such as wedding ceremonies of Ashura occasions, and these products are involved in the celebration of marriage, "Hadovh meat," circuit Asha, spraying the bride and Alngosaih. It wicker products for home use: Alibdarh, a cone-shaped container used to save the wheat, Alngosaih, a smaller volume of Alibdarh, In Dakhla, you can also indulge in total luxury and relaxation at Al Tarfa Luxury Lodge and Spa, a desert sanctuary dedicated to wellbeing and opulence. At the centre of the oasis lies the town of Mut, named after the god Amun's consort, settled since Pharaonic times. Now a modern Egyptian town of squat block concrete buildings, it has decent facilities and makes the most convenient base for travellers. You will, however, have a richer experience of Dakhla by staying in or around Al-Qasr. Mut’s slumping old town remnants and the proximity of the palm groves help to give it a touch of charm – though only a touch.

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  • Nubia Women Community

    From:Aswan/ Nubia

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    Nubians lovers of heritage, arts and crafts, professions and many developers for the character they own, and crossing through which the beauty of the great Nubia and their customs and traditions and the great heritage which dates back to the era of the Pharaohs authentic. Nubian women since ancient times known as exercising daily for some distinctive handicrafts. It adopted so totally dependent on local resources that largesse of the Nubian region by the source of those resources are agricultural crops and trees that exist in the region as well as other natural sources such as clay mud, which made him an honorary Pots and some limestone and non-calcareous stones that go one way or the other in some manufactures hand. The agricultural crops and trees, the palm tree come in the forefront as human Nubian depends on the Palm in his daily life, depending almost essential, Nubian women marked with the letter colored wicker and called on the workers wicker craft industry Name (Akhawash) craft items wicker often carried out by women, and is transmitted by heredity. Where the mother is keen to teach her daughter the assets of the craft, and in some communities men share with women, especially in the large manufacturing baskets. The wicker dye different colors are available at shops Perfumery and dyeing usually begins to boil water in a large bowl and set the dye is then required to drop the desired colored wicker and leave for 5 minutes then lifted from the water and placed in the shade to dry. The milky white wicker or are such that acquires this color due to exposure to the sun for a limited period of time with evaporated. When wicker manufacturing has to be soaked in warm water to soften even easier, whether wicker Normal or colored assortment because dyeing to Atzul water and then lubricate wicker begins manufacturing work long pigtail and different display plexus by production type and the greater the supply, the number of wicker used papers and has become the industry harder and after Spit-making wicker is formed by product to be workmanship and often are using a broad and long needle (made when mourning specially for this purpose) and thread may be sometimes of wool to decorate I have for often be wicker palm dome, where a resilient References: Khaald Abdul Majid: Specialized studies in the Nubian crafts

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  • Buffalo Horn Crafts Artisans

    From:El Beheira

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    Haji Abdullah is one of the simple farmers in the Nile Delta region. He comes from a small village called Abadia on the outskirts of Damanhur, a historical and cultural Egyptian city—Damanhur’s name was etched into the history of Egypt from ancient times till the present day. His village house lies amid the extensive agricultural land of the Delta, where the endless landscape of the Egyptian countryside, and is close to Rashid branch of the Nile River. In the fifties, Haji Abdullah started his early life as a simple farmer; he dreamed of Egypt like every other young farmer and grazed his family’s buffalo daily in the field. The buffalo’s milk was the only way he knew for livelihood. He used to participate in the activities of the Egyptian Federation of Cooperatives established by Gamal Abdel Nasser in the sixties. Afterwards, he started learning some crafts and chose the most interesting one, yet certainly the hardest. He knew its origin dates back to the Pharaonic era, where the Pharaohs used the remaining horns of buffalos and animals to make ornaments and decorative instruments. And since he had learnt a craft and discovered other uses for buffalos besides milk, he established his small workshop for buffalo horn crafts and accessories on the roof of his house. Now in 2017 and after more than 45 years, when you visit his workshop you’ll find as it is, a small corner on the top of his village house, with a thatched roof. It was turned into a school for buffalo horn crafts when his three sons and some youth joined the workshop to learn and take part in production and innovation with Haji Abdullah. Haji Abdullah says “The buffalo horn in its typical form is just an ordinary material in your hand; the creativity is in how you look at it and from which angle to craft your idea and your piece of art. It seems to me that I need to shape the whole of Egypt, its heritage and history, by the use of this raw material.” Despite his age of 70, Haji Abdullah still dreams for Egypt and his offspring, and dreams of documenting the heritage of his ancestors. He keeps on looking after his buffalo and his land every morning like the millions of farmers in Upper Egypt and Delta region.

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  • M.Fawzy - Samar arts

    From:El Beheira

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    Traditional limited trading handmade from local plants has become a rarity, his appearance on the art galleries and tourist areas is limited, although it poses colored wool yarn from the strength and style of a different industry limited, accounting for its design and its finished products art pieces exquisite, emulate hand artist immersed, saves workmanship heritage of transience and Livni Oawamh developer again where, Vtkll his penile title Aziz, close to his heart, «limited only wool-maker in Egypt». The story begins from the backyard of a country house is simple, familiar residents Alobaadih village of the city of Damanhour Beheira, Iqtzmh man Lent with his wife, not separated by only a wall of crumbling bricks, bake the wife on his right foods of her three sons, while sitting on his left surrounded by paintings art exclusively ended and strings of wool hanging from a carton lies the successor, Mohammed Fawzi, supervisor of one of the orphanages voluntarily, and the maker of the manual a few who inherited his profession from father to son, Vohdah much semi-permanent seat of the highest Noel exclusively installed the floor of clay potted and Mallawi, where he spends most of the day hours. Capture his hands one sticks plant «mulatto» wet basic -vh industry mats Aledoa- Vinsjha accurately and quickly pinpoint, thread taut cotton between the ends of the horizontal loom, and soon to inflict threads of wool, passed gracefully between cotton back and forth, creating a colorful prominent stitches, Ebagtha a powerful blow from a wooden piece called «racket» to create a new line of his portrait. According to the novel Journeyman about the evolution of his craft, rarity were not one of the industry attributes several decades ago, where «resulted in abundant plant mulatto» automatic and development on the banks of the Nile to the popularity of the craft and handed down through the generations, as well as the exchange of the different governorates and villages produced naturally limited to, describes «Fawzi» the impact of his craft golden era, saying Like other employers handicrafts, saturation exclusively maker Buhairi the secrets of his craft adjacent to his father, and trainees in his hands, refers to a small «Yassin» -mak which did not exceed the fourth of age, saying: «I might Yassin CDA we sit right hand paternally we're working, I'm working something wrong Abtunai .. in the year to some extent Atalmt. » However, the story «Fawzi» did not stop at the barrier of his inheritance to craft rare, with the beginning of the new millennium joined shows productive family hope in the distribution and marketing of its production, but over the years, with the end of the last decade, has received a proposal from the director of one of the opposition, Helmy Abdel Dayem, the introduction of a hero new to the scene a few traditional industry, and was the beginning of use of wool

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  • Gabel Elba Park's Artisans

    From:Gabel Elba Protected Area

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    Among acacia trees in Shalateen, an area in the southern stretch of the Red Sea, about 250km south of Marsa Alam, there is a small Bedouin tent made from branches of the local acacia. you can meet with Zeinab, Aisha, and Fatma — Bedouin women from the Ababda tribe — they lead a first women cooperative for train and support women working in handicrafts. “We would just gather together, a group of local women, and chat while each woman made her traditional handicrafts,” explained Aisha, while crafting her kaboota(coffee tools container) and fronds basket. “But since we received support from Gabal Elba Park, we started our first women's handicrafts initiative. It's the beginning of a revival in ancient handicraft traditions in the South Red Sea.” Zeinab added, “It was really nice to see the hand-crafted pieces made by our mothers and grandmothers in the past inspire us to produce our own new handicrafts for tourists and hope for the whole world. But we face a lot of problems. We need to travel at least 300 km every week to exhibit our crafts for tourists in some of the hotels and resorts of Marsa Alam, but each day we come back with less than 500 LE (($90). As you can imagine, 500 LE is not enough for the more than 150 women who work with us and give us their products to market and sell, we hope we can find a way to market our crafts without this daily torment.” She said that some people helped them display their products in a few showrooms in Cairo, but “they pay us very low prices and sell them for much higher. So we have to put up with the tough weekly travel to Marsa Alam to sell to tourists, who appreciate these unique handicrafts and are willing to pay a fair price. All the benefits then come straight to the women".

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  • Fadel Khaled

    From:Gabel Elba Protected Area

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    Artist Khaled Fadhel - professor - learn from the life before that learns from the school. learn from the desert and reflects the nature of creativity through creativity in his paintings. he worked as a teacher and director of the School Aburmad Southern Red Sea, inside protected mountain can and he gave to his talent, which seemed to catch drilled simple tools and burning wood appeared to innovate in the formation of panels that reflect the heritage of life there It is wonderful paintings such as shepherd to the market to fishing to falconry to a lot of art that reflect the heritage of the south and the right of each estimate

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  • Wahba Sand Arts

    From:Kharga Oasis

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    Sands are his home life, his talent and his being, wherein live on the land of the oases in the New Valley, including his drawings inspired by the most beautiful oases that fascinates people and visitors to the opposition, inside and buried his fame and talents, which exit date has not come to light. Allowahata Pentecostal artist Ahmed Wahba, was able to hire its own environment surrounding sand in the exquisite drawings in which he expressed everything in the oasis. Ahmed Wahba, 55, an Egyptian artist, was born the desert oasis of Kharga (West), love the desert and all its creations, the beauty breathtaking, and that gave him the opportunity to draw paintings sand desert reflect the culture of his hometown and roam the world countries. From nature, palms and houses colors, taking the gift of the spirit of his paintings, and I accept it visitors from inside and outside the oasis for the acquisition of his drawings. Looking in the desert valley on the different colors of sand, and Atahnha simple tools to reflect on the nature of the place to spread his work in the tourist villages in Sharm el-Sheikh, Hurghada, Dahab. Beginning with the drawing was since childhood, and in his youth discovered Alon diverse sand that God put in nature, gradient between white, yellow and even red and brown, and had come out Vitahnha and draws it out by glue, drawing out the streets and houses and people. That his attempts for the success of the idea of ​​drawing with sand and faced many obstacles because it was aimed at drawing boards "acquired" which continues on the same quality for many years with the acquired, without falling sand or damage them. To that gift and extracted from the desert mountains of white material it adds them to the White glue used in his paintings; this article learned working to install on the drawing boards. Artist applies Younis, described Ahmed Wahba as a '' paste colors of nature '', he is an artist feels function colors its sense and his talent, and his mark no one can of artists to imitate, it is '' inspired by nature '', as he called, The Artist Salah Said, Artist and sculptor Allowahata, said that " the gift of multi-talented; it calligrapher and painter who can embody me with any position, but sand colors and painted in his own way, the summit in the extravaganza, where embody the simplicity and beauty of the desert environment". References Text: part of an article in the newspaper El Mandara and Egyptian today

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  • Nubian House Artisans Luxor

    From:Luxor

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    Fatma is a young Nubian girl, one of many girls born in the Nubian migrant villages in Luxor, which were built after the forced migration of Nubians in the 1960s from Aswan to new villages more than 700km away. She has never lived in the land of her ancestors, but has heard a lot about her Nubian heritage during night sessions with her grandmothers, as well as through the stories and songs performed in marriage and death ceremonies in her village — the stories of generation after generation living on the shores of the Upper Nile. In 1999, she joined a group of young girls from her village to establish the first Nubian Handicrafts House, which served as a local workshop to produce Nubian handicrafts in Luxor. She has become specialized in crafting Nubian wool rugs. To her, they are more than just rugs: they are the process of reviving the heritage of her forefathers. She enjoys working on the traditional machinery to create, with wool, symbols of old Nubian village life: colorful houses, palm trees swaying on the banks of the Nile, boats crossing the river, women baking bread in traditional Nubian ovens, and old Nubian games. Every three days, when she finishes a new rug, she is reluctant to let it go. Although she must sell it because it is a  vital source of income for her family's livelihood, she wishes she could keep it to herself, for her future children, in order to tell them the stories of the history and heritage of their ancestors.

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  • Kome EL-Dabie Village

    From:Naqadah

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    Umm Saad, a simple craftswoman, lives in the Kome Al Dabie Village in Naqada district of Qena Governorate, located in the deep south of Egypt at about 25 km north of Luxor. The scene shows her working on the shuttle "of Pharaonic design and origin", for the production of “Ferka” - traditional ancient textiles originating from this area. She stated "Every house in our village was included a traditional“Ferka” manual piece of machinery named "Noël”. It was always set up in a special room we called " Hazel", where you’d find a big pit in the ground in order to make room for legs when working on the loom. I was exposed to the various stages that were to be carried out to produce“Ferka”. The process started by dyeing the cotton or silk threads with bright natural colorful dyes,which were then spun around small handy wheels. This was followed by the lineup of the handloom threads into a geometric pattern. At that stage, my father would come and sit cuddling his "Noël"; a machine of Pharaonic origin. He extended his legs down the loom pit, stirred the bottom of the loom, and used both hands to tie the threads together, and hit the shuttle right and left. After having finished his“Ferka” pieces, at the end of each day, he would ride his donkey and head to Naqada District about 5km away from our village to deliver and sell his “Ferka” pieces to a special textiles trader there. He would always come back again to his “Ferka” room."

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  • Shiekh Ali

    From:Naqadah

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    From Qena Governorate and the village of Sheikh Ali comes a lot of history in pottery products. From ancient times the pottery industry had a big impact there and there was a lot of reserved artifacts from that time tell us a lot about how this industry was very popular there and had a lot of improvements over the years. Now the artisans of Sheikh Ali have the heritage of there ancestors and making a lot of famous folkloric bowls and sets that are really good in making tasteful food and nice flavors.

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  • Ballas Artisans

    From:Qena & Ballas

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    Nile silt clay produces pottery that is red in colour, while desert marl clay results in whitish wares. But Egyptians have worked with this rock-like clay since predynastic times, about 4,000 B.C., particularly in the area near the modern city of Qena which called el dier or Ballas village. Driving North from Luxor along the new desert highway the entire landscape is pinky grey and the high desert plateau forms a formidable bastion all along the east side. The landscape is daunting; one may even think it threatening. Yet following the desert wadis, or dry riverbeds, men enter this bleak realm to mine clay which is then transported by camels and donkeys down to a village at the desert's edge. Here the clay is broken up into smaller pieces and soaked in a round basin beside the potter's workshop. The village is home to twenty families, each with a small workshop. A father, two sons and a cousin produce more than one hundred pots and garden water pipes each day. The work is hard and seemingly non-stop, even when a strange foreign visitor arrives on their doorstep. inisde a 4 X 5 meter room, with most of the space dedicated to the preparation of the clay. Two men knead the clay with their feet to remove pockets of air. They also remove any 'impurities', such as pieces of calcite, that might damage the final product and add some fine sand to temper the clay. Meanwhile, the potter works on his kick-wheel to complete the rounded bases for the jars. This is the final stage. The handles have already been added. He adds a length of twine around the jar's widest point near its base to hold its form while it dries. Twine markings are visible on sherds of ancient jars, so this potter works within a long tradition. Lastly, with a chip of wood or a bit of a tree branch the potter might add a little decoration, a wavy line perhaps to the shoulder. Then his father takes the jar away for final drying before firing it in the kiln. Note that the walls of the workshop have been built of pots. Cuts made in some of the pots provide useful storage spaces. This same construction is used for animal pens and dovecotes. source: traveltuesdays.blogspot.com

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  • qena berda

    From:Qena & Ballas

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    Am Mujahid, an 80-year-old artisan, is still working with his hand on the loom to produce pieces of art from kilim, carpets and shawls. Despite the simplicity of design and colors, what is made by Am Mujahid is a piece of wool art protects from cold winter. Am Mujahid is the last artisan working on Burda textile, where he makes a collection of shawls, which is called locally "shamla", as well as some pieces of hand-made kilim from sheep wool. The workmanship and beauty of the colors despite the difficulty of dyeing and also excellence in the distinctive node of the Berda textile make this art a unique product must be maintained. In the past, when many artisans worked on the Berda textile industry, a special type of black wool kilim was made, which was used for floor mats inside the house. The wool used in its manufacturing was used to protect from winter cold as it was also used for Bedouin tent cloth. Am Mujahid is still working on Al-Burda textile, in addition to Assuty Kilim and some other types of klim. And always produces art pieces of kilim and shawls.

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  • Garagous Village Pottery

    From:Qus

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    Dating back to 1954, the craft was initiated by a duo of French Monks, at the request of the renowned architect Hassan Fathi. Frenchman Robert De Mongolfier, who owned a pottery business in his hometown, was invited to Luxor, where he introduced the new craft to Garagos. Amm Nosseir Bekheit, now 72 years old, is the last surviving founder of Garagous pottery workshop. He recounts the story of how it all began “One day in 1954, when I was 14 years old, I was with my friends Tabeet Labib, Yousef Fahmy, Naeem Naguib, and Gergis Fahmy . We spotted two foreigners arriving. They seemed to be looking for something, and we assumed they were French Jesuits, here to visit our village monastery, Deir Garagous.”  “Every day we accompanied our new friends on a tour of the village, to meet the community. It was poor and agriculture was its main livelihood, though may also made a living from pottery, a 5000-year-old art form from the time of the pharaohs. Each day, after this tour, they returned to the monastery and we returned to our playing, despite the language barrier, we started to share our dreams and ambitions to do something different for our village. And the dream began to grow.” Amm Nosseir laughed and said, “The funny thing is, we knew we had a dream, but we weren't quite sure what it was. Now, 57 years later, I can share with you the essence of this dream. “In 1955 the French Jesuits told us about the Egyptian architect Hassan Fathy, noted for his ecologically pioneering architecture. Hassan Fathy arrived in our village to design the Garagos pottery workshop, with its mud-brick dome style adapted to our village environment.  After months of hard work, we finished constructing the new Garagous pottery workshop, the first-ever small factory in our village. We built it in two parts: manufacturing area and showroom. And how beautiful it was!  Brick domes with natural air vents, and natural entrances that fit into the outside environment. Days later the owner of a pottery company in France arrived to train the village youth in the secret techniques of pottery making in order to renew the ancient Egyptian art. “Garagos lead-free pottery is today characterized by turquoise, blue, and gray glazing with subtle green and yellow tones. It features ancient designs of fish, birds, and the ankh (Coptic cross) and is produced from the same red Aswan silt that the pharaohs used for their pottery. “I can't believe that 57 years have passed, and I am now a 72-year-old man. I still remember my four friends, who became my partners in the Garagous pottery workshop. We were not just partners, but like the five fingers of one hand — we shared a dream, and together we built it.”  Am Nosseir stared into the distance, as though looking far into his past and forward to the new generations in the village who will ensure the future of Garagous pottery.

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  • Hagaza Village Wood-Arts

    From:Qus

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    In the village of Hagaza, 17km from Qus on the periphery of the Eastern Desert, we met with Hagaza village wood arts artisans, exceptional artisans. "For some 25 years, the center has been training the unemployed young men of the village in wood working skills in order to alleviate poverty. This center initiated after pop botrous and franco, who train young people in Hagaza to retain their ancestors wood engraving that collect the pharaonic, Coptic and Islamic arts. Fifteen young men each year enroll in the three-year training program operated by an Egyptian non-governmental agency called the Association of Upper Egypt for Education and Development." Gamal Basheir stated. Basheer one of the artisans told us, he one of many others graduated from the program 17 years ago and has been able to provide for his family ever since. "The problem is that some people consider the products expensive, but no one can see the hard work that goes into them. To produce a piece like a panther sculpture, for example, takes about two days. Mostly, the men carve wood from the Sersau (Dalbergia sissoo) tree, which is brought in by the Center from Aswan, and sometimes Qena. " Basheer sees himself and his colleagues as artisans who engrave the symbols of their heritage into each piece they create.   In doing so, they provide a better life for their families, and send out a message of peace to the world. Articals about Hegaza wood work: egypttoday.com

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  • Siwa Oasis Community

    From:Siwa Oasis

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    Siwa Oasis - the land of the moon - that charming oasis on the outskirts of Western Sahara in Egypt. Travellers fired the name of Land of the moon. where the magic rays of the moon fall on the water springs , palm tree’s leaves and the sand dunes can not be compared. Here many local families live from local tribes in safety under protection of the traditions laws of society and many of their heritage and arts inspired from surrounded nature and culture sites. In Siwa oases many of women works trying to revive their ancestral heritage through preserve their traditional heritage crafts industry that characterize the Siwa Oasis unique culture and nature. Each day they come together at sunrise to chatting and exchange ideas about their crafts and their attempts to develops their crafts to suit modern fashion for tourist as newcomers to their oasis. Women in siwa very clever in the use of wool and silk yarns which produce clothes wedding , embroidery cotton shawls and Embroidery Bags for ladies , also Siwa very famous in production the distinctive Siwi klim and rugs. if you visit Siwa someday, don’t miss to buy some pieces of handmade crafts to enjoy cultural heritage while enjoying the natural heritage of the springs and natural swimming pools of warm pure water and also don’t miss to skating on the sand dunes while enjoy your safari trip their - in the land of the moon -. The traditional culture of Siwa shows many features unusual in Egypt, some reflecting its longstanding links with the Maghreb and the fact that the inhabitants are of Berber origin. Until a tarmac road was built to the Mediterranean coast in the 1980s Siwa’s only links with the outside world were by arduous camel tracks through the desert. These were used to export dates and olives, bring trade goods, or carry pilgrims on the route which linked the Maghreb to Cairo and hence to Mecca. As a result of this isolation, the Berber inhabitants of the Oasis developed a unique culture manifested in its crafts of basketry, pottery, silverwork and embroidery and in its style of dress. The most visible and celebrated examples of this were the bridal silver and the ensemble of silver ornaments and beads that women wore in abundance to weddings and other ceremonies. These pieces were decorated with symbols which related to Siwa’s history and beliefs and attitudes.

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  • North Sinai Villages

    From:North Sinai

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    The Governorate of Northern Sinai occupies the northern section of the peninsula ‎with the Mediterranean Sea in the North, North Sinai has a surface area of around 27564 square ‎kilometers and a population of around 400,000 inhabitants with most of them ‎residing by the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, except for some nomadic Bedouins ‎who live in the desert located in the middle of Sinai.The environmental characteristics of North Sinai can be divided into two categories; ‎the Coastal area of the Mediterranean Sea represented in the Northern plains and ‎they are covered with sand dunes and the desert environment located inside the Sinai ‎Peninsula with a large number of mountains like the Maghara Mountain being 776 ‎meters high and the Halal Mountain being 881 meters high. Having one of the longest beaches over the Mediterranean Sea in Egypt, El Arish city is ‎popular for its sandy beaches that are bordered by a large number of palm trees. The Egyptians, during different periods, of time took El Arish as an outpost in Sinai ‎especially during the Roman and Ptolemaic eras and then the city was fortified during the Middle Ages and then during the ruling period of the Ottomans. ‎ Beduines come from places around Sinai such as Palestine, Saudi Arabia and Jordan. They settled in Sinai long ago, even though the environment is and was quite tough for living. There is hardly anything else than sand and mountains. Only a closer glance shows that there are some few oasises, plants and animals that allow the Beduines to live anomadic life as they have always done.

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  • Shandweel Tulle

    From:Sohag

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    In the 1950s, on Shandweel island in the deep south of Egypt, Um Alia hand-crafted traditional wedding clothes for her daughter and other girls in the village — a vital part of the wedding ceremony in that region. She would thread a tiny needle with silver and gold thread, weaving them through Tilly cloth into shapes and symbols representing the heritage of her forebears. She drew camels to indicate the wedding caravan, waves like the waters of the Nile, trees for rural village life, stars for the wedding ceremony's nights, and finally triangles for mountains and to protect the bride from envy. No girl could move to her husband's house without at least three Tilly dresses.  Years passed. Girls began to go to school and were exposed to modern fashions. Um Alia's handmade work went out of style; people were no longer interested in this tradition. Though mothers cannot forget their grandmothers' traditions, they also cannot change the mind of a new generation. In the 1990s, Dr. Shahira Fawzy, an Egyptian researcher, visited Shandweel in search of Um Alia. Fortunately, she found her still alive. Together, Dr. Shahira and Um Alia established a small Tilly handicrafts workshop. Ten girls received training, and each girl would then go on to train another ten. Now, more than 1000 woman work in Tilly handicrafts from their homes and through a number NGOs in Shandweel village. The women of Shandweel have collectively revived the heritage of their grandmothers, a 19thcentury Upper Egyptian tradition.

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  • Catherine Crafts

    From:South Sinai

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    Salima El-Gebaly is a Bedouin from Saint Catherine. She was the first among her community to obtain a secondary school certificate, and went on to work for years in Saint Catherine Park. As a child, while playing in the monastery or wandering along the wadis between the mountains, Salima noticed the Bedouin women, who tended goats in the mountains or collected medicinal herbs, drawing what they saw. They did not use pen and paper, but rather wool thread on traditional fabrics, to express their feelings and depict their natural environment. Salima began to see this as “a traditional artisanal documentation of their environment” and a true Bedouin art form. In 1998, with the support of the Saint Catherine protectorate, she began to be involved in training local Bedouin women and marketing their traditional handicrafts. The natural elements of this environment — the sun, birds, trees, and wadis — are a recurrent motif, but what she finds remarkable is how, in the handmade products, “you will always find the sun, or the same tree, drawn in different styles.” In 2002, El-Gebaly decided to lead a local community-based enterprise. With the support of the protectorate, she established "Fan Sina" (meaning 'The Art of Sinai') as a craft and income generation initiative. Starting with only 5 women, today Fan Sina works with 350 women from 4 different tribes along the valleys of the holy town of Saint Catherine, South Sinai. Today, Fan Sina has a total of 350 Bedouin women producer and provides them with a monthly income.  A products from FAN SINA , Inspired by nomadic culture and the natural environment, made by  Bedouin ladies make authentically beautiful handcrafted embroidery and products. Through using colorful thread and beads brings back to life motifs of elder tribesmen sawn in an attire of modernity, fashion and functionality much suitable for our present day. FanSina's products are more than a piece of handicraft. They are a symbol for empowering women living in the far-away valleys of St. Katherine’s, on the margin of today's society. Their work, passion, and art shape thread and cloth into beautiful bags and cushions, and these help shape the lives of these 300+ women and their families.

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  • Wadi Al Gimal Artisans

    From:Wadi El-Gimal National Park

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    Zainab Mahmoud Fadl, daughter of Marsa Alam City, a woman in her forties, was married at the age of thirteen, and a mother of two girls and a young man,. she did not know how to work with the coastal beads, but she had a wish that motivated her to discover by herself how to stack units of beads side by side, perfectly textured, and magnificent. At noon each day she carries what she wove, and goes to the beach of her city on the Red Sea to display on the ground all her beautifully made bracelets that are so brightly colored as she wishes her life to be. Zainab, Aisha, Amnaa and more than 200 women working artists try to preserve the legacy of their ancestors from the protectorate valley and the area south of Marsa Alam beside Egypt's Eastern Desert villages like Kulaan , Apogson,  Hamata and Berenice and Sheikh shadliy and many valleys of small mountains All the people there are descendant of the tribe Al ababda with a great history and rich cultural heritage, they inhabit "Wadi Al-Gimal" protected area, one of the most beautiful natural reserves places in Egypt The Ababda extend from the Nile at Aswan to the Red Sea, and reach northward to the Qena-Quseir road, thus occupying the southern border of Egypt east of the Nile. They call themselves "sons of the Jinns.  In this area the local population is the Ababda bedouin who have many rich and colourful traditions - much of which is endangered by the pressures of modern life and the economic exploitation of the area and its' rescources. Traditionally nomadic, many still work herding their flocks of goats through the network of wadis in search of grazing land and water.  They are renowned for their skilled animal tracking abilities. The Wadi El Gemal Nationa Park ( meaning "Valley of the Camels" ) is an extensive area of land and coastal water lying to the south of Marsa Alam.  It includes many diverse ecological habitats and a rich variety of animal and bird types including several endangered species.

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  • Zawya Copper Artisan

    From:zaweya and daher

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    Craft relies on the use of brass for manufacturing jewelery and toiletry, other products related to household tools such as pots, also used in making weapons such as swords, daggers, spears and door knobs. In Zawya area in cairo, a group of young artisans started their project a long time to learn and train in the industry of brass ornaments and also inlays leather with brass.

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  • Khaymia Artisans

    From:Al Darb Al Ahmer

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    Khayamia is an ethnic Egyptian art for using multi colored fabrics in making traditional pavilions. Historically, this art was linked to the fabrication of the Holy Kaaba’s cover decorated with gold and silver threads. The cover used to be produced in Egypt and then transferred to Saudi Arabia in a majestic procession “Mahmal”, until the sixties of the last century. Originally, there was a special ceremony for the endorsement of new Khayamia craftsman, by examining his work through experienced and older craftsmen. In case of success, the new artisan used to host a banquet as a celebration party. Nowadays, entering this craft is automatically done after acquiring the required techniques. Khayamia is fabric art which is done by adding small pieces of fabric of different colours and material on a bigger piece of fabric to create pieces of art. The small pieces of fabric are placed by hidden stitches using a needle. The main area for khaymia arts is khayamia street in heart of old cairo close to bab zewela.

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  • Bashteel Pottery Community

    From:Giza

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    Bashteel, a neighborhood in Imbaba district part of Giza Governorate. An area inhabited by many people suffering mostly from poverty and low income rates in addition to the lack of many basic infrastructure of water, electricity and sanitation. Random popular houses that include many families trying in various ways to provide a living and try to continue a decent life. In the midst of all these circumstances, a group of artisans managed to create a collection of ceramic artifacts to open up a means of extra income and chose to form these pieces to take the forms of popular folkoloric characters and other famous celebrities. We find popular folkloric characters from Upper Egypt on coffee shop or at home with the family, we find the seller in the market and the juice walking man, and also find Umm Kulthum with her band and other characters of television series for children. The beauty of the workmanship of these products is the strength of raw materials used by artisans to make the product and the beauty of the colors used in the products bright colors and diversity gives beauty to the product and creativity of the artisans of the region of Bashteel.

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  • Mo'tamdia Artisans

    From:Giza

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    In a suburb of Giza and not far from the Pyramids of Giza, more than 150 women gather together daily to teach each other the art of rutal embroidery, they created their own NGO since 1996 to assist them in marketing their products. They live in that area since it was an agricultural area, when they come from Sohag in upper egypt and setteld in Giza, the local environment of their origin villages make an inspiration for them in the production of their distinctive embroidered wool cloth, their works reflect the motifs of Egyptian environment such as palm trees, houses, camels, people, river nile and more  of the Egyptian environment of nature and humans.

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  • Mervat - Folk Dolls

    From:Giza

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    The art of traditional dolls making still one of supreme folkolorik crafts in Egypt that enthuses a lot of artisans. Mervat is one of those artisans who love the art of folkolorik dolls making. A young girl from Mo'tamadia Giza. she design and creates dolls since her childhood and developed a lot from her style by using metal wires, small accessories and lots of colorful fabrics.  In a suburb of Giza and not far from the Pyramids of Giza, more than 150 women gather together daily to teacheach other the art of rutal embroidery, they created their own NGO since 1996 to assist them in marketing their products. They live in that area since it was an agricultural area, when they come from Sohag in upper egypt and setteld in Giza, the local environment of their origin villages make an inspiration for them in the production of their distinctive embroidered wool cloth, their works reflect the motifs of Egyptian environment such as palm trees, houses, camels, people, river nile and more of the Egyptian environment of nature and humans.

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Yadaweya Magazine

stay in touch with Egyptian artisans and handmade treasures