0

01098883041

  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image

Qena & Ballas

Ninety-one kilometres east of Al-Balyana, and 62km north of Luxor, Qena sits on a huge bend of the river and at the intersection of the main Nile road and the road running across the desert to the Red Sea towns of Port Safaga and Hurghada. A market town and provincial capital, it is a useful junction for a visit to the spectacular temple complex at Dendara, located just outside the town. It’s also the place to be on the 14th of the Islamic month of Sha’ban, when the city’s 12th-century patron saint, Abdel Rehim al-Qenawi, is celebrated. Qena is noted for its pottery, in particular the porous water.

In addition to its Ancient Egyptian heritage as the city of Cainepolis. Qena has a considerable Islamic heritage and a famous mosque. The Maghrebi Abd el-Rahim settled in Qena upon his return from Mecca and founded a Sufi center here. Upon his death in 1195, the mosque was built above his tomb and became a place of pilgrimage. There is a huge modern mosque of Sheikh el-Qenawi in the main square which attests to his importance.

Qena has witnessed major restorations, and came third in the UNESCO City Beauty contest.

Discover More Discover Less

Artists in Qena & Ballas


  • Total Artists: 0
  • Items Per Page: 12 : 24

Attractions in Qena & Ballas


  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image

Sheikh el-Qenawi Mosque

Sheikh Abdel Rahim El Qenawi was born in the Moroccan Ceuta district, 1127. El Qenawi was a religious Sufi scholar and an interpreter of the true Islamic teachings of the holy Quran. The Sheikh spent his childhood learning the true Islamic teachings and at the age of seven he memorized all verses of Quran. After his father’s death, he travelled to the city of Damascus in Syria, where he spent eight years gaining a lot of knowledge from various Islamic scholars. He was interested in Sufism.  Afterwards, he decided to move back to his village, where his father’s post as a scholar and teacher of Islamic religion remained vacant, and upon his return the village scholars asked him to take the post and he agreed. El Qenawi spent five years preaching and guiding people on their duties as a Muslim towards God and society. During that period, Egypt’s ruler issued a decree to make El Qenawi the Sheikh of Qena and since that day he became known as El Quenaiy. He brought in much profit from his trading in Qena and started helping poor students who wanted to learn about the true Islamic teachings. He established his own Sufism school, called Al Qenawiya. He died in 1196. continue reading about it on our blogpost link

Discover More Read Less
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image

Deir el-Ballas 

Deir el-Ballas is an archaeological site in Upper Egypt. It was the location of a royal palace and administration center occupied by rulers of the Seventeenth Dynasty in ancient Egypt's late Second Intermediate Period.  Deir el-Ballas was located on the west bank of the Nile, approximately twenty kilometers south of Dendara and some 30 miles north of Thebes (modern-day Luxor). has not yet been determined who constructed the buildings in this area or when. However, Seqenenre Tao and Kamose, the final two rulers of the Seventeenth Dynasty, are known to have used the palaces.  For as yet undetermined reasons the rulers of the succeeding New Kingdom (approximately 1550-1070 BCE) abandoned the site; however, several New Kingdom-era graves were discovered in this area during the 20th century. The complex seems to have consisted of several facilities enclosed by a wall measuring 900 by 400 feet. A Northern Palace served as the royal residence with a village for staff members, workers, and artisans built nearby, while a two-storied Southern Palace was used an administrative center. "Also included in the complex were silos and stables, indicating the agricultural interests of the royal family."

Discover More Read Less
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image

dandara temple

Dendera Temple complex, (Ancient Egyptian: Iunet or Tantere; the 19th-century English spelling in most sources, including Belzoni, was Tentyra) is located about 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) south-east of Dendera, Egypt. It is one of the best-preserved temple complexes in Egypt. The area was used as the sixth Nome of Upper Egypt, south of Abydos. The whole complex covers some 40,000 square meters and is surrounded by a hefty mud brick enclosed wall. Dendera was a site for chapels or shrines from the beginning of history of ancient Egypt. It seems that pharaoh Pepi I (ca. 2250 BC) built on this site and evidence exists of a temple in the eighteenth dynasty (ca 1500 BC). But the earliest extant building in the compound today is the Mammisi raised by Nectanebo II – last of the native pharaohs (360–343 BC). The features in the complex include Hathor temple (the main temple), Temple of the birth of Isis, Sacred Lake, Sanatorium, Mammisi of Nectanebo II, Christian Basilica, Roman Mammisi, a Bark shine, Gateways of Domitian & Trajan and the Roman Kiosk.

Discover More Read Less
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image
  • Attraction Image

The Shrine of Sheikh Ibrahim Al Fawi

The shrine is made for sheikh Ibrahim bin Omar bin Ali bin Abdul-Zaher bin Abdul Mohsen and his lineage goes back to Al-Hussein, Originally was from fao in Iraq he came from there in 698 AH to the village of Faou in Deshna. The shrine of Sheikh Ibrahim Al-Fawi is located in the eastern part of the village of Faw in the center of Deshna. It consists of two rooms, led by an open courtyard.

Discover More Read Less
or

Don't have yadaweya account?

Sign Up
or

Already have yadaweya account?

Login
loading ...

Yadaweya Magazine

stay in touch with Egyptian artisans and handmade treasures